CARY MOCK -                    producing passionate performances
VOICE LESSONS:
Materials / Expectations and What to Expect
 
Consider acting coaching alongside private voice lessons!  Learn how to take the stage as a singing actor!
 
 
Recommended Materials (Choose 1 or 2 books to begin with)
Stage to Stage cannot provide copied music for students due to copyright infringement.  Cary has a ONE WEEK music loan policy.  Borrowed music must be returned one week after its loan.
 
For younger vocalists ages 8-10
 
*Any 2 books from the series Solos for Kids published by Hal Leonard (Disney Solos for Kids, Broadway Solos for Kids, etc..) This series includes an accompaniment cd helpful for practice.
 
 
For older, more advanced students ages 11+
 
*Twenty-Four Italian Songs and Arias from G. Schirmer Publications.
(We will advise medium-low or medium-high range after the first lesson).
 
*Any book from the Hal Leonard SingingActor series. 
 
*Musical Theatre Anthology for Teens Young Men or Young Women edition
by Louise Lerch ($15.99)
 
* The Teen Musical Theatre Collection Young Men or Young Women edition by Hal Leonard ($16.99)
 
ADULTS:
 
*The Singers Musical Theatre Anthology Vol 1,2,3,4,or 5 by Hal Leaonard ($19.99)
 
*26 Italian songs and Arias Med Low or Med High by John Glen Paton  ($10.00)
 
*Twenty-Four Italian Songs and Arias from G. Schirmer Publications.
(We will advise medium-low or medium-high range after the first lesson).
 
*Any book from the Hal Leonard SingingActor series. 
 
* 24 Italian Songs and Arias Med Low or Med High (w/CD)  
($14.99)
 
During the Lesson: 
Students can expect to explore any of the following during their vocal coaching journey: music reading, tone placement, tone quality, proper breathing, projection, pitch matching, ear training and of course, stage presence.  We encourage students to bring their own recording device to lessons.  This way students can record rehearsal accompaniments, be reminded of lesson instruction.
 
As with any physical activity, warm-ups are an essential part of each session.  Young vocal students have not learned these critical exercises, and students should be assured that their voice is being stretched and strengthened as they practice this ritual. However, as students become familiar and comfortable with the purpose and rationale behind each warm-up, they can begin to warm-up on their own prior to arriving at their lesson. 
 
How Much Should I Practice?
The key to success is daily practice. The more you practice, the more progress you can expect. For vocal students, using the warm-ups taught in class is a great way to begin your daily practice. Spending at least another 30 minutes practicing assigned songs and implementing techniques discussed in class while using your recording will also ensure progress.
 
The bottom line of any practice session is improvement.  Singing or playing without seeing improvement isn’t necessarily productive practice.  How quickly you improve can help you determine that exact amount of time you need to practice.
 
 
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